Back

Brazil, the biggest soybean exporter, is strengthening its lead against the U.S. after trading giants spent billions of dollars on building new terminals and developing routes to ports in the north through the Amazon region.

“Brazil’s northern ports are allowing the country to export big volumes of grain without the historical loading delays or vessel queues,” said Sergio Mendes, general director at the grain-export group Anec. “Traders are shipping through the north the same soybean volumes they usually export from Santos, Latin America’s largest port,” in the south, he said. “This is a huge conquest.”

 

By Tatiana Freitas via Bloomberg

 

Read full article here

Coffee farmers in Brazil’s countryside could be soon be using cryptocurrency for their day-to-day needs.

A major arabica-bean cooperative, Minasul, is planning to this month launch a blockchain-based digital coin that will be backed by coffee supplies. Farmer members will be able to use the “coffeecoin” to buy fertilizer, machinery and other non-farm products, including cars and food, Jose Marcos Magalhaes, Minasul’s president, said in an interview during the Global Coffee Forum in Campinas, Sao Paulo state.

 

By Fabiana Batista via Bloomberg

 

Read full article here

By 2028, Latin America and the Caribbean will account for more than 25% of global exports of agricultural and fishery products, according to a new report by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The publication highlights the expansion of regional protagonism in the midst of the slowdown in world production and trade.

According to the Agricultural Outlook 2019-2028 survey, over the next ten years, global demand for agricultural goods is expected to increase by 15%. On average, trade in agricultural and fishery commodities is expected to rise 1.3% per year in the period under review. Despite the growth estimate, the index is lower than the 3.3% annual average for the 2009-2018 decade.

 

Via DATAGRO

 

Read full article here

The agreement between Mercosur and the European Union will modernize and increase the competitiveness of Brazilian agriculture. The evaluation was made by the Minister of Agriculture, Tereza Cristina, during a press interview. At the time, she said the agreement will allow the country’s products to become more attractive and reach a market of approximately 700 million people.

“It will bring to Brazil a quest for more quality and competitiveness to access this market, which is a market accessed by countries such as Canada, Korea. Brazil will be on an equal footing,” said the minister.

 

Via DATAGRO

 

Read full article here

In 2018, Brazil was the world’s largest exporter of beef, providing close to 20 percent of total global beef exports, outpacing India, the second-largest exporter, by 527,000 metric tons carcass weight equivalent (CWE). Moreover, USDA projects that Brazil will continue its export growth trajectory for the next decade, reaching 2.9 million metric tons, or 23 percent of the world’s total beef exports, by 2028.

Brazil has the world’s second-largest cattle herd—232 million head—and its production is largely based on grass. Increased beef demand worldwide has stimulated increased production and productivity gains. In 2018, Brazil reached its highest level of beef production at 9.9 million metric tons. According to a September 2018 report by USDA’s Foreign Agriculture Service (FAS), programs that subsidize and improve pastures and crossbreeding are primary drivers of the overall increase of cattle production in 2019 (another significant factor is improved pasture conditions in major production regions). Between 1990 and 2018, the Brazilian cattle herd expanded by 56 percent (based on estimates from the FAS Production, Supply and Distribution database). Brazil’s beef production last peaked in 2014, when it reached 9.7 million metric tons CWE. During Brazil’s 2014-16 recession, coupled with devaluation of Brazil’s national currency, the Brazilian real, beef output continued to grow, though at a slower pace, while higher local-currency denominated prices compensated for higher production expenses.

 

Via USDA

 

Read full article here

After 20 years of long negotiations, Mercosur and the European Union sealed a free trade agreement between the blocs. According to information from the Ministry of Agriculture, the two sides came to an understanding on Friday (28) during a meeting held in Brussels, Belgium. In a statement, the ministry stressed that this is a historic moment.

According to MAPA, negotiations between the parties have intensified in recent days, and on the Brazilian side were led by the Minister of Agriculture, Tereza Cristina; the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Ernesto Araújo; and the special secretary of Foreign Trade and International Affairs of the Ministry of Economy, Marcos Troyjo.

 

Via DATAGRO

 

Read full article here

U.S. pork producers will fall behind global competitors if the U.S. Food and Drug Administration continues to move forward with plans to regulate livestock gene editing as a drug. That was the message the National Pork Producers Council delivered during a media teleconference Tuesday on the current regulatory oversight of gene-edited livestock on America’s farms.

Gene editing accelerates genetic improvements that could be realized over long periods of time through breeding. It allows for simple changes in a pig’s native genetic structure without introducing genes from another species. Emerging applications include raising pigs resistant to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome, a highly contagious swine disease that causes significant animal suffering and costs pork producers worldwide billions of dollars.

 

By Ann Hess via National Hog Farmer

 

Read full article here

SAO PAULO (Reuters) – Beef-crazy Brazil, with its all-you-can-eat steak houses, world-leading meatpackers and more cattle than people, is not the first place you might look for plant-based alternatives to meat.

But companies from JBS SA, the largest beef producer in the world, to BRF SA, the No.1 chicken exporter, are looking to tap a wave of interest from environmentally conscious eaters seeking vegetable substitutes.

 

By Alberto Alerigi via Reuters

 

Read full article here

SAO PAULO, June 18 (Reuters) – Brazilian sugar mills are closely watching the 2019 U.S. corn crop for reduced harvests that could boost prices for the cereal, raising ethanol production costs there and opening room for Brazilian ethanol to gain domestic market share.

In that scenario, ethanol demand in Brazil would likely rise further, experts say, leading mills to maintain current production mix that heavily favors ethanol at the expense of sugar.

 

By Marcelo Teixeira via Reuters

 

Read full article here

The impacts associated with the Agricultural Zero Risk of Climate (Zarc), created by Embrapa, brought about an economy of about R $ 16.8 billion for Brazilian agribusiness last year. The estimate was calculated for Embrapa’s Social Balance Sheet 2018 and is equivalent, mainly, to losses that the Country no longer suffer from crop losses and the consequent securitizations that would provoke them. According to the Balance Sheet methodology, the work of Embrapa is responsible for 40% of these results, which is equivalent to approximately R $ 6.7 billion.

This is because, based on historical climatic data, the Zarc indicates the dates of planting in which there is less risk of crop frustration caused by adverse environmental conditions, that is, it guides the producer and the financing agent about the times and regions most suitable for planting, generating greater safety.

 

By DATAGRO

 

Read full article here

Chamber Updates Stay connected with Chamber activities